Mark Curtis

Mark Curtis is an independent author, journalist and consultant. He is a former Research Fellow at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) and was until recently Director of the World Development Movement. He has worked in the field of international development for 14 years, including as Head of Global Advocacy and Policy at Christian Aid and Head of Policy at ActionAid.

He has written five books and numerous articles on British and US foreign policies and international development and trade issues. His most recent books are: Unpeople: Britain's Secret Human Rights Abuses (Vintage, London, 2004); Web of Deceit: Britain's Real Role in the World (Vintage, London, 2003); Trade for Life: Making Trade Work for Poor People (Christian Aid, London, 2001); The Great Deception: Anglo-American Power and World Order (Pluto, London, 1998); and The Ambiguities of Power: British Foreign Policy since 1945 (Zed, London, 1995).

He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Strathclyde and has been Visiting Research Fellow at the Institut Français des Relations Internationales, Paris and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik, Bonn. He is a graduate of Goldsmiths' College, University of London and the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Current projects include a new book on British foreign policy and radical Islam, travel to various African countries to investigate why hunger is deepening among poor farmers and investigations into the harsh impact of British mining and energy companies overseas as well as the continuing hopeless task of interesting a mainstream media broadcaster in films on the reality of British foreign policy.

 

Mark Curtis, Secret Affairs: Britain's Collusion with Radical Islam. Serpent's Tail 2010.

Mark Curtis, Web of Deceit: Britain's Real Role in the World. With a Foreword by John Pilger. Vintage 2003.

Mark Curtis, The Ambiguites of Power: British Foreign Policy Since 1945. Zed Books 1995.



Corbyn’s Labour party should promote more moderation, less extremism in UK foreign policy, 21 June 2017

A London attacker and UK covert operations in Syria and Libya, 7 June 2017

The Manchester Bombing as Blowback: The Latest Evidence by Mark Curtis and Nafeez Ahmed, Information Clearing House, 3 June 2017

The British establishment is putting our lives at risk: Our state's key ally is a major public threat, markcurtis.info, 24 May 2017

UK General Election: What are the foreign policy implications? New Internationalist, 18 May 2017

A dangerous new era in British foreign policy: Talk at Stop the War annual conference, 27 April 2017

The UN: A brief history of the UK's long opposition, 14 March 2017

Why protests against Trump should be widened to change current UK foreign policy, 3 February 2017

Britain’s violations of international law, 23 January 2017

Britain’s Seven Covert Wars: RAF Drones, Embedded SAS Forces, Training of Jihadists, Global Research, 15 October 2016

Hilary Benn's speech The media's war footing on Corbyn and Syria, 4 December 2015

The coup in Iran, 1953, 30 November 2011 (12 February 2007)

Afghanistan is being stifled by military operations, The Guardian/Comment is free, 19 February 2011

The EU's ugly resource grab, The Guardian, 14 November 2010

Secret Affairs, By Mark Curtis Reviewed by Kim Sengupta, The Independent, 30 July 2010

Bin Laden, the Taliban, Zawahiri: Britain's done business with them all, The Guardian, 5 July 2010

Norway's dirty little secrets, The Guardian/Comment is free, 24 September 2009

 

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